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Loss of Libido from Surgery? | Ask the Expert
Human sexual response is a highly complex process that is closely linked to both bodily and psychological factors. As you have so honestly outlined, you have suffered a series of physical and deeply stressful events that directly relate to your female organs, all capable of decreasing your <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/sexual_health/low_sex_drive_women.page">libido.</a> You and your husband would likely benefit from discussing these issues with a female psychologist who specializes in human sexuality. Despite the unfortunate rupture of your upper vagina and emergency repair after undergoing a <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/gynecology/what_is_a_hysterectomy.page">hysterectomy</a> for uterine cancer, this recognized complication is not related to subsequent nerve damage. After hysterectomy, pain with intercourse usually relates to abnormal healing at the top of the vagina or to vaginal dryness from a lack of estrogen. Assuming the top of your vagina has healed well, you should discuss the use of vaginal estrogen with your doctor. Thank you for intimately detailing your journey. Most importantly, continue to take care of your physical and emotional health.
Women's Health,

Question:

I have no sensation in my lower abdomen or vagina when aroused by foreplay or direct contact. I had a full hysterectomy for endometrial cancer last year followed by surgery to repair a torn vaginal cuff and intestinal prolapse. Nerve damage or libido?

Answer:

Andrew Brill, M.D.Andrew Brill, M.D.Gynecological SurgeonCalifornia Pacific Medical Center
Expert
Andrew Brill, M.D.Gynecological SurgeonCalifornia Pacific Medical Center

Dr. Andrew I. Brill is Director of Minimally Invasive Gynecology and Reparative Pelvic Surgery at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He is an internationally recognized pioneer and expert in gynecologic endoscopy and minimally invasive surgical techniques for female disorders. His numerous publications and textbook chapters cover a wide range of subjects including basic to advanced techniques in operative laparoscopy and hysteroscopy, reducing risk during minimally invasive surgery, outpatient surgical solutions, and less invasive procedures for incontinence and uterine prolapse. He is the past president of the AAGL, the largest international organization for minimally invasive gynecology.

See Dr. Brill's profile

Human sexual response is a highly complex process that is closely linked to both bodily and psychological factors. As you have so honestly outlined, you have suffered a series of physical and deeply stressful events that directly relate to your female organs, all capable of decreasing your libido.

You and your husband would likely benefit from discussing these issues with a female psychologist who specializes in human sexuality.

Despite the unfortunate rupture of your upper vagina and emergency repair after undergoing a hysterectomy for uterine cancer, this recognized complication is not related to subsequent nerve damage.

After hysterectomy, pain with intercourse usually relates to abnormal healing at the top of the vagina or to vaginal dryness from a lack of estrogen. Assuming the top of your vagina has healed well, you should discuss the use of vaginal estrogen with your doctor.

Thank you for intimately detailing your journey. Most importantly, continue to take care of your physical and emotional health.

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