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Should I See a Cardiologist for Heart Palpitations? | Ask the Expert
In general, <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/heart/heart_palpitations.page">heart palpitations</a> are not a serious problem as long as the heart is healthy. Being in good physical shape, and staying active is a good sign that the heart is indeed healthy. There are times, however, that a problem in the heart is present, but still not bad enough to get noticed. Palpitations can be an early sign that there is something wrong with the heart. With palpitations, the first step is to capture the ECG during an episode of palpitations. Depending on what the rhythm is on the ECG, you can often tell right away if the palpitations are something to worry about. A cardiologist can look at the results of the ECG and heart monitors and determine if the palpitations are safe and just an annoyance, or if they point to a need for further evaluation. The suggestion by the primary care provider to consult a cardiologist is sound advice. <strong>Read more:</strong> <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/heart/mphs1_chestpain.page">Chest Pain & Heart Palpitations</a> <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/heart/arrythmia.page">Arrhythmia and Tachycardia in Women</a> <a href="https://www.mylifestages.org/health/heart/heart.page">Heart disease articles, videos, and other resources</a>
Heart Health,

Question:

Are heart palpitations a serious symptom for a 62-year-old in good physical shape? I’m very active and ride a bike daily. My PCP did a Holter exam and ECG and suggested I see a cardiologist. I want to cooperate but I think this may be a minor concern.

Answer:

Richard Hongo, MDRichard Hongo, MDCardiac ElectrophysiologyCalifornia Pacific Medical Center
Expert
Richard Hongo, MDCardiac ElectrophysiologyCalifornia Pacific Medical Center

Dr. Hongo’s expertise covers the full range of current technology and skill in cardiac arrhythmias management, including specialized pacemakers for resynchronizing the weakened heart, implantable defibrillators, and catheter ablation for heart rhythm problems. He is also principal investigator for several trials in electrophysiology, and lectures widely on all aspects of arrhythmias. He is a member and fellow of the American College of Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, and the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Dr. Richard Hongo received his M.D. in 1995 from Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Dr. Hongo is board certified in Cardiology and Cardiac Electrophysiology.

In general, heart palpitations are not a serious problem as long as the heart is healthy. Being in good physical shape, and staying active is a good sign that the heart is indeed healthy.

There are times, however, that a problem in the heart is present, but still not bad enough to get noticed. Palpitations can be an early sign that there is something wrong with the heart. With palpitations, the first step is to capture the ECG during an episode of palpitations. Depending on what the rhythm is on the ECG, you can often tell right away if the palpitations are something to worry about.

A cardiologist can look at the results of the ECG and heart monitors and determine if the palpitations are safe and just an annoyance, or if they point to a need for further evaluation. The suggestion by the primary care provider to consult a cardiologist is sound advice.

Read more:
Chest Pain & Heart Palpitations
Arrhythmia and Tachycardia in Women
Heart disease articles, videos, and other resources

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